A dairy company has been able to keep costs low by increasing production of grass-fed beef, and the U,S.

government has increased demand for dairy products in response.

But for dairy farmers in many states, the dairy industry has suffered from a lack of supply and is struggling to meet the increasing demand for grass-finished dairy products.

In a new report from the Center for American Progress, dairy farmers across the country report that they are struggling to maintain the same herd size that they did just a few years ago.

For many farmers, the problem is the same one that has plagued the dairy farming industry since the mid-1980s, when the USDA banned dairy cows from raking hay.

“We’re going through a crisis now, and I think we’ve been at this for a while,” said Matt DeGroot, executive director of the American Dairy Association.

“You have a big shift in the industry.

The U.N. agency that regulates the U to which the U S. sells dairy products has declared that grass- fed dairy products are no longer acceptable as a substitute for milk. “

The industry’s just not in the best place right now.”

The U.N. agency that regulates the U to which the U S. sells dairy products has declared that grass- fed dairy products are no longer acceptable as a substitute for milk.

As of March, the USDA said that only about a third of the country’s milk supply would be grass- and pastured-fed cows.

About 10 percent of the U’s milk production is now produced on dairy farms, including about 3 percent of grassland dairy producers.

But a recent study by the USDA and the Center on Nutrition Policy and Promotion (CNP) found that dairy producers in the U are seeing their milk prices spike even more than the corn and soybean industry.

The price of milk has doubled for the last 10 years, rising from $.06 to $.15 per gallon in 2010 to $1.18 to $2.30 per gallon this year.

That’s about a 100 percent increase, said David J. Hart, senior dairy analyst at the National Dairy Council.

“That’s a real concern for dairy producers, because the cost of production is way higher now than it was 10 years ago,” Hart said.

A recent study from the USDA found that the U Dairy Association’s annual revenue is $7 billion, up more than 25 percent from 2008. “

What is driving the price increase is the growing demand for the products,” he said.

A recent study from the USDA found that the U Dairy Association’s annual revenue is $7 billion, up more than 25 percent from 2008.

The dairy industry’s financial woes are becoming more and more apparent as the country continues to shift away from milk as a source of nutrition for children and the elderly.

Dairy production in the United States is set to fall by about 20 percent in the next decade as demand for milk declines.

The U, and its allies in Europe, Japan and elsewhere, have been importing more milk from China and India.

A new study from economists at Harvard University found that China has been exporting more milk to the U than it’s receiving back.

The new milk, according to the study, is “substantially higher in fat and calories and less nutritive than its U. S. counterpart.”

And a new study released last month from the National Agricultural Statistics Service, the federal government’s official data source, shows that China’s exports of milk are up 30 percent from 2007.

And China’s imports of U.s. milk jumped 44 percent in 2010.

“China’s exports have been growing faster than U. s. exports over the last decade, and U. states are now getting about half of what they used to get from China,” said David W. Smith, a senior dairy economist at the CNP.

“I don’t know if that is sustainable, but I do know it’s not sustainable.”

In a recent statement, the U., U.K., Germany, France, Austria, Sweden and Japan pledged to reduce their milk imports by a combined 50 percent by 2020.

The United States also is on track to import about 40 percent more milk by 2030.

But even though demand for U. milk has increased, farmers are struggling.

According to the USDA, about 70 percent of U dairy farmers are still paying their staff in cash.

The average monthly wage for a farmer in the state of Iowa is about $1,200, according the American Association of Livestock Producers.

“They’ve been working hard,” DeGroots said.

But the demand for non-dairy milk has not kept up.

The federal government said in 2015 that milk prices in the dairy business were at a historic low.

In 2016, the cost per gallon of milk was about $.08.

But last month, the average price of a gallon of U,s.

dairy milk was $.22.

The CNP found that since 2009, prices have increased an average of about $3.30 for U